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UN rights chief appeals to parties in Burundi to implement peace agreements

Along with the protection of civilians and children in armed conflict, Mr. Vieira de Mello stressed the importance of strengthening Burundi’s capacity to deal with human rights issues and reforming the judiciary.His meetings yesterday with President Pierre Buyoya, Vice-President Domitien Nadyizeye and other senior officials included a strong appeal for broad commitment to the Arusha agreement as well as discussions about how his Office could support the overall peace process in Burundi.The High Commissioner also called for end to the culture of impunity, emphasizing that trust could be restored through holding accountable those responsible for gross human rights violations, such as the massacre that took place in Itaba, and settling the issue of prisoners and detainees. read more

Arctic tern numbers soar after National Trust babysits chicks roundtheclock for four

first_imgIn 2016 just two Arctic terns and five little terns managed to take flight because of the threat from stoats, foxes, marine pollution and tidal surges.But this year numbers have surge. The vigil is part of ongoing conservation efforts to protect the birds, which flock to the Northumberland Coast each summer to breed.This summer, the National Trust bought 200 acres of saltmarsh, woodland, hedgerows, pasture and sand dunes at Tughall Mill, to make sure the birds were undisturbed. Arctic tern numbers are soaring after National Trust rangers babysat fledgling chicks round-the-clock for four months to make sure they were protected from high tides and predators.More than 500 Arctic terns, and five internationally threatened little terns, have flown their nesting sites in Northumberland unscathed after wildlife experts set up a non-stop vigil,  between May and August.Erecting tents close to breeding areas, the team have monitored the birds 24 hours a day. In caring for the land, the National Trust will link up hedgerows to create wildlife corridors as well as improve woodland areas through the removal of non-native invasive species.The ranger team will also plant native woodland and hedgerow trees, and through careful grazing management, encourage native plant species found in the dunes and grasslands, including rare calcareous plants such as purple milk vetch and autumn gentian. This work will also allow the shorebird colonies, farmland birds and declining waders such as curlew, lapwing and ringed plover, to flourish. Simon Lee, General Manager of National Trust Northumberland Coast, said: “We are passionate about looking after special places for the benefit of people, wildlife and nature.“We already care for 12 miles of the Northumberland Coast. Now we will be able to look after the wider landscape helping wildlife and nature flourish, as well as safeguarding the site for future generations.”Only around 1,800 breeding pairs of Arctic terns return to the Long Nanny from Antarctica each year, between May and July. Last year one tagged tern from the Farne Islands clocked up 59,650 miles in one migration, more than twice the circumference of the planet.The land was acquired through the Trust’s Neptune campaign which, for more than 50 years, has enabled the conservation charity to care for Britain’s coastline. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. National Trust Rangers Jane Lancaster and Kate Bradshaw on new land purchased by the National Trust by Long Nanny Reserve on the Northumberland coast. National Trust Rangers Jane Lancaster and Kate Bradshaw on new land purchased by the National Trust by Long Nanny Reserve on the Northumberland coast.Credit: Paul Kingston/NorthNews The birds fly in from the Arctic to breed in the summer Credit: Paul Kingston/NorthNewcenter_img The rangers have been monitoring the birds since May David Feige, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) Officer for the Northumberland Coast, said: “The site at Tughall Mill is a very significant part of the Northumberland Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, especially as it hosts such an important colony of little and Arctic terns, and fantastic dune grassland.“It also has great potential to support a wide range of other declining wildlife, and so the AONB Partnership is delighted that the National Trust has been able to buy this site and we look forward to seeing it flourish in the Trust’s care.” Fewer than 10 chicks fledged last year  The rangers have been monitoring the birds since May The birds fly in from the Arctic to breed in the summer  Fewer than 10 chicks fledged last year last_img read more